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Another Excerpt From Life of a Baby Boomer

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     “I tell you the truth; anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” Luke 18:17 NIV

My husband and I went to see the movie, “Do You Believe?” http://centurylink.net/search/index.php?context=homepage&tab=Web&q=Do+You+Believe%2Fthe+movie and it reminded me of my husband’s struggle growing up and trying to keep his faith, in spite of being disappointed by adults countless times. At least God always had his back and made it possible for him to continue to believe there was something greater than himself.

“Do You Believe?” is an Indie movie and it’s a great film to see at the Easter season. Be prepared to bring plenty of Kleenex! Below is an excerpt from Steve’s book, “Life of a Baby Boomer.” http://www.amazon.com/LIFE-BABY-BOOMER-Steven-Stinnett-ebook/dp/B00CMTCGT0/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1427166777&sr=8-4&keywords=life+of+a+baby+boomer

So my family moved to Downey, California, and that’s where I completed the rest of my education. This was only a mile from where I spent the first four years of my life with my Grandma and Grandpa Rockwell.

The previous owner of the house had left a rowboat in the garage, and I mentioned to my mother that we could go boating. Her answer was that was a nice idea. Within a few weeks, I came home from school one day to discover the boat was gone, never to be mentioned again. I had grown used to being disappointed by adults, but I could still be surprised, and I never gave up hoping that, just once, an adult in my life would follow through with keeping a promise.

Nevertheless, as I grew up, I continued to have the faith of a child, believing my Father in heaven would answer my prayers. Even with my family, I never quite gave up believing one day my mother would keep her promises and that my life would get better.

Every Christmas, and on my birthday, I would ask for a bicycle, and my mother would promise me one next year. Instead, I inherited my brother’s old bike. One day, I was walking home from my new school, and spotted a brand-new ten-speed bicycle by our front porch. Heart pounding, I started running as fast as I could toward the house, but then the paperboy came out of our house, hopped onto the bike, and sped away.

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I’d grown quite accustomed to disappointment, but the bicycle incident had huge repercussions for me in my new school. I had high hopes for this school since I was no longer taken out of class for my learning disabilities. I was in regular class, no longer a rider of the short bus, no longer receiving special instruction. I was now a regular student in regular classes with no special needs and with dreams of happiness and success on my horizon.

West Junior High was an upper-middle class school, a far cry from the lower socioeconomic school in Compton where I had come from, but the bicycle rack managed to single me out as being different once again. The bike rack determined who and what I was. Most of the kids had new ten-speed bikes, and here I was, riding my brother’s old bike, a throw-back from the fifties, and this put me in the social standing of a near-zero. At least I wasn’t still on the short bus, so this shame was fairly minor on my scale of public humiliations…

In spite of my disappointments as a child, I still understood what it took to maintain the faith of a little child, and, through God’s grace, I maintained that faith my entire life, knowing deep down inside that God always had a plan for me. During the scariest moments of my life, He was always there, if I only took the time to listen, but sometimes, I forgot.

Thanks for stopping by. This was an excerpt from Steve Stinnett’s memoir, Life of a Baby Boomer.

Bren

 

 

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